Sochi 2014

Impressions. Gwendal Peizerat: Sochi is Russia’s Nice

Impressions. Gwendal Peizerat: Sochi is Russia’s Nice

Coca-Cola Journey decided to look at the Games through the eyes of those at the centre of events  – popular sports stars for who Sochi 2014 is not their first Olympics. Today we are talking to Gwendal Peizerat , who won gold for pair skating at the 2002 Olympics. The Frenchman who knows Russia better than most (he shared his triumph in Salt Lake City with Russian-born Marina Anisina) told us the difference between his beloved Alps and Sochi, and why it reminds him of Nice. We also asked him what chances the Russian figure skating team has of winning medals. - Before coming to Sochi I thought the mountains here were narrow, quite low and covered with soft snow, - admitted Gwendal. But when I saw them I realised how steep they are. It’s not an exaggeration to say it’s a very impressive sight. I have not tried the slopes of Krasnaya Polyana myself yet, but plan to, and then I will be able to speak about them in more detail. - Does Sochi remind you of any city in France? - Let me think. I would say Sochi is a Russian Nice. I am not talking about the spirit of the city, these are different, but the two places both have the sea and the mountains, and that's cool.- Do you have anyone who compares to Russia’s Pearl, Yulia Lipnitskaya? - Yulia reminds me of American Tara Lipinski who was Olympic champion at the 1998 Nagano games. First, their family names sound similar. Second, Yulia has beaten Tara’s age record for competing. She did a magnificent job on her Olympic debut.  Lipnitskaya is part of a story which has seen a regular Russian sportsperson turn into a princess. She showed real professionalism to cope with the burden of performing before the crowds of her own homeland. That was really impressive. - At the other end of the scale was the performance of the grand master of Russian figure skating – Evgeny Plushenko. How did you rate his performance? - The main thing Eugeny managed to keep, is his personality as a fighter. 20 years on ice is no joke!

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10 Fun things about Olympics that will change your perspective

Sports are always good for your life, and one of the Olympic objectives has always been to promote a healthier lifestyle. By learning some curious things about the sports played in Sochi you may want to engage into something new. If you haven't yet. Hockey: Pucks against the train speed Hockey puck, if you hit it right, can go as fast as 168 km/h. To compare, the highest speed Russian car Lada Kalina can develop is around 165–183 km/h. Or, for another example, Sochi city train 'Lastochka' can go as fast as 160 km/h. That means, you can rick a hockey puck to get around same quick. Hockey games will be held in Sochi from 12 to 23 of February Curling: Kilograms matter Curling is only now getting popularilty despite being on the Olympic list for 16 years already. Its very good news for those who dreams to lose weight. After playing your very first game you lose around 2 kilos, and it's not bad at all, right? Even soccer does not produce such an effect. Curling will hit the stage in Sochi on February 10-21. Ski Jumping: Three floors above the snow! When athlets make a ski jump they fly as high as 8 meters into the air. It is almost as high as 3 floors of a multi-story building. It may look easy to rise this high, it's much harder to land afterwards without breaking your skies. Or bones. You can see ski jumpers fly high on February 8-17. Snowboard: The fastest man on a board The title of the fastest snowboarder has been claimed already long ago by a man named Danner Powell and no one has managed to steal it from him ever since. His personal record is 201,9 km/h. But the most surprising thing is that Darren is an Australian and his love for the snow is as logical as, let's say, the love of a dog for mice. The youngest and coolest are already out on the slopes of Sochi mountains since February 6. They will be there till February 22 to be wrapped up by the dual slalom . Nordic Combined: The most norvegian sport For 12 years after it was made an Olympic sport, Nordic

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Как попасть на Олимпиаду, если ты только сейчас на это решился?

How to catch the last minute Olympic train and enjoy it

With the Games just a day away, planes to Sochi are packed, hotels sold out, excitiment pumped up into the air of Russia's southern resort. But what if your decision to come and join the crowd is so fresh you don't know where to run and what to do to be able to enjoy the historic event. Here is a short guide to help you have an enjoyable experience during the Games in Sochi in February 7-23. To get there The cheapest way to get to Sochi from Russia's capital is by Aeroflot special flights to Sochi. Aeroflot is the biggest and the best known Russian air carrier. They've set up a special schedule of Sochi flights that take off every couple of hours for a very special price of around 70 US dollars to fly one way. To make the experience more authentic, they will even treat you will small Sochi 2014 souvenirs to make sure you are all excited about your destination. However, most of their tickets, especially for the first week of the Games, are probably already sold out. Your budget-conscious second option would be a train ride, 100 dollars to travel one way, but it will take at least a full day before it gets to where the plane flies in 2 hours. Car rides are unfortunately not an option, since the authorities have enforced a special regime in the region for the period of time between January 7th and April 17 when you can only enter the resort area with a special permit. Private transportation inside of Sochi is also very limited and if you dare to break the rules, you’ll get an immediate 150 dollar fine. But the good news is – visitors as well as the local residents can fully rely on public transportation – it runs really well inside of Sochi. To get around Sochi is a very stretched out city sort of squeezed between the sea and the mountains. To ensure efficient communication, the authorities have settled a next-to-perfect public transportation system. You can take a bus ride for around 1,5 dollars to nearly everywhere in the city. The most important hubs like the

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Лучшее олимпийское видео Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola’s Best Shows

The very first time that Coca-Cola sponsored the Olympics was in Amsterdam in 1928. The choices of advertising means were far from what we have now, coming down to printed materials only. The sole memory of the Amsterdam games is this graceful lady in the banner offering a man to taste from the red-and-white branded bottle. The world has changed so much since the Amsterdam Games, it is now hard to separate the Olymics from the commercials inticing you extensively into having another Coke with ice. Here is the list of what's considered Coca-Cola's 5 very best commercials.Seoul-1988 Seoul Summer Games have been remembered for political and doping scandals. North Korea boycotted the Olympics after the South refused to share the Games with them and move some of the competitions from Seoul to Pyongyang. Sprinter Ben Johnson, who ran 100m distance in just 9.79 seconds, was caught red-handed using doping, as well as the Bolgarian heavy weight athlets Mitko Grablev and Angel Genchev. The Bulgarians were busted by a member of the Soviet delegation. He learned they were going to cheat at the doping tests by using the med lab restroom right before being examined. To prevent that, he locked himself inside the restroom for hours, and the Bulgarians had no choice but to quit the competition. Don't worry though, nothing of that Olympic drama came into the commercial. Atlanta-1996 «The 100th» Olympics (counting from the summer games of 1896) took place in America's Atlanta. The choice of the venue was very simple – Atlanta is a host for the headquarters of Coca-Cola, the permanent sponsor of the main sports event on the planet. To honor this fact, the investments into the games were more generous then ever before (the real numbers were never made public), and that was not the only record. 12 million tickets were sold for these games, and the live transmission grabbed attention of unbelievable two thirds of the whole populaton population of the Earth. The achievement

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Coca-Cola and the Olympics: The Story of Being Together

Coca-Cola and the Olympics: The Story of Being Together

Coca-Cola and the modern day Olympics share a lot of common history in how and where they started off and grew into something of world’s importance. It’s not surprising they are so tightly linked now in their activities and in people’s minds. On May 8 of 1886 an American druggist John Pemberton from Atlanta came up with the ‘secret formula’ of Coca-Cola. It was just 6 years away from the moment when Pierre De Coubertin decided to revive the Olympic games for the modern generations. The International Olympic Committee was established on June 23d of 1894, and in 1896 the modern Olympics were carried out for the very first time in the Greek Athens where 311 sportsmen came to participate from 13 countries. That was almost exactly the moment Coca Cola stepped out of the US and started international sales. We have put together a timeline of the most significant and exciting facts shared by both the Olympics and Coca Cola. •                 Our partnership with the Olympics started in Ambsterdam Amsterdam, 1928 The romance between Coca Cola and the Olympics was born during the games in Amsterdam in 1928 when the US national team and 1000 boxes of Coca Cola shared a voyage over the Atlantic to make a hit in the Old World. Bottles filled with the magic beverage were sold in special booths right next to the Olympic stadium. •                 The bage of 1932 is a rarity and a desired valuable for Olympic regalia collectors. Los Angeles, 1932 Over two hundred teenagers in white gloves were offering Coca Cola to 105,000 visitors of the Los Angeles Coliseum. In 1934 swimmer Johnny Weissmuller, Olympic gold winner of 1924 and 1928 (later he became a famous actor), was the first Olympic figure to start promoting our beverages. Together with actress Maureen O’Sullivan he posed for the company’s posters and branded trays

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Sochi Olympics Opening Ceremony

They did it

The dazzling display at the opening ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games left the whole world breathless. Every brilliant turn of the show was a new photo-opportunity. That explains why it was so hard for us to pick out the15 most memorable moments.  AN HOUR BEFORE THE SHOW Some details of the opening ceremony were revealed just an hour before the show. Konstantin Ernst, the great mind behind the performance, gave in to the journalistic pressure and spilled at least some of the beans. He admitted the show would consist of 18 chapters from Russian history squeezed into 2.5 hours, the national team would parade to the sounds of ‘Not Gonna Get Us’, a hit from the once very popular band t.A.T.u.   Opera singer Anna Netrebko would also sing the national anthem.  But the festive Olympic spirit was spreading across Sochi long before.  At Sochi airport, the arriving spectators were greeted by members of Coca-Cola cheering "We’re very happy you’ve come to Sochi" The most impatient could choose to go to the Olympic Park straight from the airport. It was open from 6 in the evening. Prior to the opening there were more than just journalists, volunteers and spectators.One minute before the ceremony. Nearly no free spaces. And those spots still available will be taken by athletes from the national teams after the parade. 40,000 people in all!SOCHI 2014 OPENING CEREMONY There was a lot of speculation about the main storyline of the ceremony. But no one was even close. The beginning of the show. Athletes come out in to the main Olympic arena. A projection of unbelievable resolution shows a picture of their respective countries. Konstantin Ernst promised this part of the show would be very dynamic, saying usually it's a little neglected. In Sochi they did it differently.  The Greeks, who were the founders of the Olympic movement, were the first ones to enter the Fisht Olympic Stadium.  We will skip straight to the

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“V Dvizhenii!”

You will want to move it

As you walk into the Olympic Park among the festivities at Sochi 2014, one of the first things you’ll see is a huge red double sphere-shaped tent that cannot fail to catch your eye. Yes, that's Coca-Cola. As is always the case, Coca-Cola is impossible to miss or confuse with anything else.On the 9th of February the Grand Opening Ceremony of the Coca-Cola Active Healthy Living Showcase took place. The tent is hosting Coca-Cola's newest project 'V Dvizhenii' (which translates as 'in motion') and is aimed at supporting sport and promoting a healthy lifestyle. Inside there is a detailed and very nicely illustrated display that will encourage you to live your life more actively and healthily. Possibly - with more Coca-Cola.  Smart, active and fit young greeters in our characteristic Coca-Cola jackets meet you at the gate. By the way, their outfits are made out of recycled Coca-Cola bottles. These youngsters won't let go of you for a good 35 minutes. After briefly walking you through the history of the world’s most popular beverage, they will get you moving.   After a brief hesitation no doubt you will be glad to repeat their movements, whether it's a dance, a sit up or a stretch. And as you do that, we hope your excitement will grow. That's how Coca-Cola aims to prove moving is a pleasure. If you are lucky enough and work-out hard enough, you could even win a collectible Olympics pin - a treasure at an event known for its tradition in pins.  As you move through the tent, you’ll get the chance to have your picture taken with an Olympic Torch in your hands. Prior to the Games, Coca-Cola travelled all across Russia with the Olympic Torch Relay and knows what it takes to start a flame. Special bracelets with a Q-code will connect you with Coca-Cola's website later on to download the picture and share it with your friends.  And of course you can’t walk out of the tent without a sip of Coca-Cola. It will be served to you in a neat souvenir bottle

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От саней до самолета

Going far flying high

The Olympic Flame took quite a fancy ride around Russia for the sake of this year's Sochi 2014 Games. We picked the most interesting moments of this awesome trip. October 8th was the day the Olympic Flame left Moscow and took off for the historic journey across the biggest country in the world.The motor rally ran through the towns and cities of the Central and north-western Russia. On the 39th day of the Relay the special flight from Saint-Petersburg took the Flame up and to Russia’s most western region of Kaliningrad.On November 7th the Flame left the Planet! 'Soyuz' Space Rocket, decorated with Sochi 2014 special Olympic designs, lifted the Flame up to the International Space Station. The Olympic Flame in the Orbit – the history had not seen that ever before!From the Far Eastern city of Vladivostok the Flame set off to travel along the Trans-Siberian Railroad. It covered over 18,000 kilometers by railroad in a special train specifically made for the occasion and painted with Sochi 2014 colors!The Flame went up into the air more than one time. A specially assigned helicopter carried the Flame for the distance of over 2,000 kilometers.Raindeer ride was another very uncommon leg of Olympic Flame's travel.Snowy roads of the north can of course be conquered by raindeer, but also by special machinery. Vehicles that facilitate the work of Russia's field and gas workers gladly joined the Relay.«Afina» bulk carrier vessel leaves the port of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky with the Olympic Flame onboard.How many more surprises will the Relay bring? The organizers say we will be amazed yet more than once.Rumours have it, the Olympic Flame will get inside a Formula 1 race car and on top of the mount of Elbrus. How will it get there – we are yet to find out! Stay tuned with out reports!

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